Those popes who bear the name, "Pius," are the greatest guardians of the Church against heresy. This blog is a watchdog for modernism in the Church. In reality, outside this blog, the members of the board temper their criticisms and opinions with prudence and charity so as to help souls in their journey towards Christ. But sometimes, for the sake of their own sanity, the authors of this blog just need to blow off some steam. The result is Totus Pius.

24 July 2006

Website of the Week VII

In our attempts to help a friend we were looking up online apologetics sites and came across this one: catholicapologetics.org.

While we haven't read through the entire (massive) site it appears to be a most excellent resource! It is a essentially an online book - but if you want you can download a PDF of the entire thing.

The site is put together by Paul Flanagan and Robert Schihl, whose profiles are rather impressive.

Their intro reads:

This book surveys the origin and development of Roman Catholic Christianity from the period of the apostolic church, through the post-apostolic church and into the conciliar movement. Principal attention is paid to the biblical basis of both doctrine and dogma as well as the role of paradosis (i.e. handing on the truth) in the history of the Church. Particular attention is also paid to the hierarchical founding and succession of leadership throughout the centuries.

This is a set of lecture notes used since 1985 to teach the basis for key doctrines and dogmas of the Roman Catholic Church. The objectives of the course were, and are:

  • To present the biblical basis for the origin and development of the Roman Catholic Church.
  • To present the development of the canon of Scripture and evolution of biblical teaching in the Church.
  • To understand the role of paradosis/tradition in the oral transmission of revelation.
  • To study the Council of Jerusalem, described in the 15th chapter of The Acts of the Apostles and its role in the development of doctrine in the conciliar movement in the Church.
  • To understand the revelation, doctrinal development and practice of the sacramental life in the history of the Church.
  • To study the role of the Holy Spirit as teaching authority in the Church.
  • To study the revelation and development of hierarchical authority in the Church.
  • To understand the hierarchy of truths in the Church as well as the role of private devotion and personal growth in holiness.

Browse through it, use it, we hope it helps!

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